READY for LAUNCH

stringbing:

I did a demo and showed a certain pipeline in Adobe Flash and After Effects to a few folks. The tie downs for this one is really bad since I had to rush it. No model sheet was used, I basically just improvised for this one - so you’ll notice the character changing all the time. I decided to go with a “cowboy during a duel” excercise for this one.
1. Rough Pass - Rough poses with select breakdowns
2. Tie down - Tied down drawings with inbetween
3. Color - Color and after effects

Hi! Do you have any tips on drawing body figures? Especially the length of the legs? And do you have tips on drawing hands? Thanks!

makanidotdot:

Only way to learn figures is to look at them and draw them.  I’ve taken figure drawing and anatomy for artist classes in addition to drawing a lot.  Take them if you can!  And I fuck up legs more than anything because I don’t draw them enough.  Easy springboard though is searching for Andrew Loomis books.

Same with hands, though there are some fairly easy to describe formulas for hands so I drew up a couple rq

First of all, for probably 90% of the hand poses you’re gonna draw, think fingers like the petals on a pinwheel.  They all curve the same degree, in relation to the previous.  

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animationtidbits:

The Croods - Chris Sanders

You may get asked this a lot, so please excuse my ignorance - but how do you go about constructing character expressions and body language and such? Thanks!

makanidotdot:

Besides The Basics (construction of heads and skulls and muscles and skeletons and how they move), I’ll go over some things I’ve been trying to work on myself lately:

1. Treat expressions as a single gesture of the face/head, as opposed to a head and then individual features dumped on a plate and arranged into an expression.

First, just get down the big shapes of your expression, just like you would for a pose.  

So say I wanna do a low angle angry pose.  I know the features are gonna be all mashed down at the bottom because of perspective.

 Scribble it down

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start to put on features

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fix stuff

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put on more stuff

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fix stuff again

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erasing and flipping and stuff a whole bunch until you are happy with it or stop caring

Whole head is a gesture!image

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2. Just like a facial expression, jot down where the important parts of an entire pose goes first.  You can force the rest of the body to fit the pose.

So here I knew I wanted the shoulders tilted a certain direction, and te hand to be in that particular position in front of her face. 

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That’s the simplest explanation I got.  Don’t be afraid to push and pull faces and bodies around! Worry about being “on model” last!

michaeljruocco:

rufftoon:

First look of Popeye/ CG animation test 

The animation starts at 2:00. The opening is pretty interesting to listen to as well.

The movements. Sooooo cartoony!! Whoever rigged those characters knows magic or something.

Well that blew away MY expectations… wonderful stuff! Now I REALLY can’t wait for the movie!

Aww man Genndy is the best! He really makes those 3d models as cartoony as possible, and its great :D

wannabeanimator:

Inbetweening with Joshua Taback part 1 | 2 | 3

mickeyandcompany:

Concept art and animation panels for Treasure Planet 2

Before Treasure Planet was shown in cinemas, Thomas Schumacher, then president of Walt Disney Feature Animation, mentioned the possibilities of having direct-to-video releases for Treasure Planet as well as a television series. He stated that they already had “a story and some storyboards and concepts up and a script for what a sequel to [Treasure Planet] could be,” and that they also had a “notion” of what the series would be.

Director Jun Falkenstein and screenwriter Evan Spiliotopoulos began early development on Treasure Planet 2. In the sequel, Jim Hawkins and Kate, his love interest and classmate at the Royal Interstellar Academy, must team with Long John Silver to stop the villainous Ironbeard from freeing the inmates of Botany Bay Prison Asteroid. Willem Dafoe was set to voice Ironbeard. The sequel was canceled when Treasure Planet disappointed at the box office.

(Sources: x, x)

wannabeanimator:

The Ballad of Nessie (2011) | exploratory sketches - Andreas Deja

Each animator gets just a few scenes to animate, and the project is done. Nessie (under six minutes long) was animated by Ruben Aquino, Dale Baer, Randy Haycock, Mark Henn and myself.

Stevie Wermers-Skelton came up with film’s concept, and Kevin Deters joined her to co-direct.

We enjoyed working on simple, cartoony material again that was inspired by some of the Disney shorts from the 1950s. - Deja